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WOMAN CAN SEE MORE THAN THE AVERAGE HUMAN WITH HER ‘SUPERHUMAN’ SIGHT

More colors of the color spectrum are visible to an English woman than most other humans on earth.

Neuroscientist Gabriele Jordan, and her colleagues from Newcastle University in England, knew that there was someone out there with a little something extra… 2 cones in the eye that allow them to see thousands of more shades of color than most of us ‘normal’  folk, to be exact.

Most people don’t know that this is actually possible, I sure didn’t, and these researchers weren’t even sure they’d ever find somebody with this incredibly rare ability to see beyond what was thought possible, until they did.

Discover Magazine writes:

An average human, utterly unremarkable in every way, can 
perceive a million different colors. Vermilion, puce, cerulean, periwinkle, chartreuse—we have thousands of words for them, but mere language can never capture our extraordinary range of hues. Our powers of color vision derive from cells in our eyes called cones, three types in all, each triggered by different wavelengths of light. Every moment our eyes are open, those three flavors of cone fire off messages to the brain. The brain then combines the signals to produce the sensation we call color.

Vision is complex, but the calculus of color is strangely simple: Each cone confers the ability to distinguish around a hundred shades, so the total number of combinations is at least 1003, or a million. Take one cone away—go from being what scientists call a trichromat to a dichromat—and the number of possible combinations drops a factor of 100, to 10,000. Almost all other mammals, including dogs and New World monkeys, are dichromats. The richness of the world we see is rivaled only by that of birds and some insects, which also perceive the ultraviolet part of the spectrum.

Researchers suspect, though, that some people see even more. Living among us are people with four cones, who might experience a range of colors invisible to the rest. It’s possible these so-called tetrachromats see a hundred million colors, with each familiar hue fracturing into a hundred more subtle shades for which there are no names, no paint swatches. And because perceiving color is a personal experience, they would have no way of knowing they see far beyond what we consider the limits of human vision.

Over the course of two decades, Newcastle University neuroscientist Gabriele Jordan and her colleagues have been searching for people endowed with this super-vision. Two years ago, Jordan finally found one. A doctor living in northern England, referred to only as cDa29 in the literature, is the first tetrachromat known to science. She is almost surely not the last.

Read more at discovermagazine.com

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